Friday, June 26, 2015

11 Powerful Quotes from Daisaku Ikeda on Jobs, Careers and Winning in Life!



 Daisaku Ikeda's 
words on 
Jobs, Careers 
and Winning in Life

As Buddhists, we chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo 
while focusing our minds on our determinations. 
We are all determined to show actual proof of the power of our practice, 
so we can encourage others. 
We chant to be the shining examples that there IS a solution to suffering...there IS a way to succeed and help others to succeed along the way. 
We are chanting TO our own lives, 
to summon forth our immense and immeasurable power. 
As each of us heads into the work week 
I offer you these quotes by Daisaku Ikeda for some added inspiration. 

(Compiled by Bob Hasegawa)
NOTE- Emphasis and headings added

1.Beauty, benefit and good

Mr. Makiguchi taught that there are three kinds of value: beauty, benefit and good. In the working world the value of beauty means to find a job you like; the value of benefit is to get a job that earns you a salary that can support your daily life; the value of good means to find a job that helps others and contributes to society. 
(Faith Into Action, page 45)

2No more moaning...no complaining!

President Toda said that the most important thing is to first become indispensable wherever you are. Instead of moaning that a job differs from what you'd like to be doing, he said, become a first-class individual at the job. This will open the path leading to your next phase in life, during which you should also continue doing your best. Such continuous efforts are guaranteed to land you a job that you like, that supports your life, and that allows you to contribute to society. 
(Faith Into Action, page 45.)

3. The Fundamental Cause of Unhappiness

Problems as we have seen, are not in themselves the fundamental cause of unhappiness. Lack of power and wisdom to solve them is the real cause. Fortunately we all innately possess infinite power and wisdom;  and Buddhism shows us how to develop these qualities.
When in the depths of despair or grappling with a difficult problem, it may be hard to believe that our lives possess unlimited potential. But this is the essence of one of the profoundest Buddhist teachings, known as three thousand realms in a single moment of life, which we will explore in this chapter. 
(Unlocking the Mysteries of Birth and Death, page 105.)

4. Success Means Not Giving Up

I hope each of you will realize success in your respective fields, fully recognizing that success means not giving up halfway but resolutely pursuing the path you have chosen. To this end, it is also important that you realize that the place where you work is a place for forging your character and growing as a human being. By extension, therefore, it is a place for your Buddhist practice, a place for practicing your faith. When you view things from this angle, all your complaints will disappear. No one is more pathetic than someone who is constantly complaining. 
(For Today and Tomorrow, Daily Encouragement, page 283.)

5. Excel at something

There is a saying that urges us, "Excel at something!" It is important to become trusted by others wherever you are and to shine with excellence. Sometimes people may dislike their job at first but grow to love it once they become serious about doing their best. "What one likes, one will do well," goes another saying. Growing to like your job will also enable you to develop your talent. 
(Faith Into Action, page 46.)

6. Never be defeated!

Buddhism is an earnest struggle to win. This is what the Daishonin teaches. A Buddhist must not be defeated. I hope you will maintain an alert and winning spirit in your work and daily life, taking courageous action and showing triumphant actual proof time and time again. 
(Faith Into Action, page 3.)

7. What is actual proof?

When we speak of showing actual proof, it doesn't mean we have to try to put on a show of being any more knowledgeable or accomplished than we are. It is my hope that, in the manner that best suits your situation, you will prove the validity of this Buddhism by steadily improving in your daily life, your family, place of work and community and by polishing your character. (Faith Into Action, page 4.)

8. Chant to become people of strong will

Life is a struggle with ourselves. It is a tug-of-war between progress and regression, between happiness and unhappiness. Those short on willpower or self-motivation should chant Daimoku with conviction to become people of strong will who can tackle any problems with seriousness and determination. (Faith Into Action, page 109.)

9. What is faith?

Everything is contained in a single word faith. It encompasses truth, courage, wisdom and good fortune. It includes compassion and humanity as well as peace, culture, and happiness.
Faith is eternal hope; it is the secret to limitless self-development. Faith is the most basic principle of growth. (Discussions On Youth, Volume 2, pages 163-164.)

10. Faith and Work

Faith and daily life, faith and work these are not separate things. They are one and the same. To think of them as separate ~ faith is faith, and ~ work is work is theoretical faith. Based on the recognition that work and faith are the same, we should put one hundred percent of our energy into our jobs and one hundred percent into faith, too. When we resolve to do this, we enter the path of victory in life. Faith means to show irrefutable proof of victory amid the realities of society and in our own daily lives. 
(For Today and Tomorrow, Daily Encouragement, page 175.)

11. Strength is Happiness

Strength is itself victory. In weakness and cowardice there is no happiness. When you wage a struggle, you might win or you might lose. But regardless of the short-term outcome, the very fact of your continuing to struggle is proof of your victory as a human being. A strong spirit, strong faith and strong prayer ~ developing these is victory and the world of Buddhahood. (For Today and Tomorrow, Daily Encouragement, page 50.)

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